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115096

Revolution 1989: The Fall of the Soviet Empire

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Author:

Victor Sebestyen

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51023

The Fall of Yugoslavia

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Author:

Misha Glenny

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108946

The Rise and Fall of Communism

Traces The Origins Of The Communist Ideology Through Its Collapse In Many Nations Following Perestroika, In An Extensively Researched Volume That Also Explores Communism's Current Incarnations. Origin...s And Development. The Idea Of Communism ; Communism And Socialism : The Early Years ; The Russian Revolutions And Civil War ; Building Socialism : Russia And The Soviet Union, 1917-40 ; International Communism Between The Two World Wars ; What Do We Mean By A Communist System? -- Communism Ascendant. The Appeals Of Communism ; Communism And The Second World War ; The Communist Takeovers In Europe : Indigenous Paths ; The Communist Takeovers In Europe : Soviet Impositions ; The Communists Take Power In China ; Post-war Stalinism And The Break With Yugoslavia -- Surviving Without Stalin. Khrushchev And The Twentieth Party Congress ; Zig-zags On The Road To Communism ; Revisionism And Revolution In Eastern Europe ; Cuba : A Caribbean Communist State ; China : From The Hundred Flowers To Cultural Revolution ; Communism In Asia And Africa ; The Prague Spring ; The Era Of Stagnation : The Soviet Union Under Brezhnev -- Pluralizing Pressures. The Challenge From Poland : John Paul Ii, Lech Wałesa, And The Rise Of Solidarity ; Reform In China : Deng Xiaoping And After ; The Challenge Of The West -- Interpreting The Fall Of Communism. Gorbachev, Perestroika, And The Attempt To Reform Communism, 1985-87 ; The Dismantling Of Soviet Communism, 1988-89 ; The End Of Communism In Europe ; The Break-up Of The Soviet State ; Why Did Communism Last So Long? ; What Caused The Collapse Of Communism? ; What's Left Of Communism? Archie Brown. Originally Published: London : Bodley Head, 2009. Includes Bibliographical References (p. [623]-688) And Index.

Author:

Archie Brown

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187

Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse, 1970-2000

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Author:

Stephen Kotkin

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98114

Reinventing Collapse: The Soviet Example and American Prospects

The title of this book is Reinventing Collapse, and I have to say that's exactly what this book manages to do. It's a short book, so you could reqad it in just a few hours, but it is packed with ...information and "make you think" moments. Orlov's unique perpsective on American life engages the reader and opens your eyes to what life in America is like to an outsider. Without a doubt the most useful aspect of this book are the details of what the situation was like in Russia after their political collapse. This book is a tutorial on how the reader might modify thier life in the future if (or when) America collapses. Reviewed by Matt Mayer - Groovy Green In the waning days of the American empire, we find ourselves mired in political crisis, with our foreign policy coming under sharp criticism and our economy in steep decline. These trends mirror the experience of the Soviet Union in the early 1980s. Reinventing Collapse examines the circumstances of the demise of the Soviet superpower and offers clear insights into how we might prepare for coming events. Rather than focusing on doom and gloom, Reinventing Collapse suggests that there is room for optimism if we focus our efforts on personal and cultural transformation. With characteristic dry humor, Dmitry Orlov identifies three progressive stages of response to the looming crisis: Mitigation—alleviating the impact of the coming upheaval Adaptation—adjusting to the reality of changed conditions Opportunity—flourishing after the collapse He argues that by examining maladaptive parts of our common cultural baggage, we can survive, thrive, and discover more meaningful and fulfilling lives, in spite of steadily deteriorating circumstances. This challenging yet inspiring work is a must-read for anyone concerned about energy, geopolitics, international relations, and life in a post-Peak Oil world. Dmitry Orlov was born in Leningrad and immigrated to the United States at the age of twelve. He was an eyewitness to the Soviet collapse over several extended visits to his Russian homeland between the late eighties and mid-nineties. He is an engineer and a leading Peak Oil theorist whose writing is featured on such sites as www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net and www.powerswitch.org.uk.

Author:

Dmitry Orlov

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133777

Moscow, December 25th, 1991

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Author:

Conor O'Clery

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95265

A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to Gorbachev (The New Cold War History)

Western Interpretations Of The Cold War--both Realist And Neoconservative--have Erred By Exaggerating Either The Kremlin's Pragmatism Or Its Aggressiveness, Argues The Author. Explaining The Interests..., Aspirations Illusions, Fears, And Misperceptions Of The Kremlin Leaders And The Soviet Elites, The Author Offers A Soviet Perspective On The Greatest Standoff Of The Twentieth Century. The Soviet People And Stalin Between War And Peace, 1945 -- Stalin's Road To The Cold War, 1945-1948 -- Stalemate In Germany, 1945-1953 -- Kremlin Politics And Peaceful Coexistence, 1953-1957 -- The Nuclear Education Of Khrushchev, 1953-1963 -- The Soviet Home Front: First Cracks, 1953-1968 -- Brezhnev And The Road To Détente, 1965-1972 -- Détente's Decline And Soviet Overreach, 1973-1979 -- The Old Guard's Exit, 1980-1987 -- Gorbachev And The End Of Soviet Power, 1988-1991. Vladislav M. Zubok. Includes Bibliographical References (p. [417]-453) And Index.

Author:

Vladislav M. Zubok

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65878

The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR, and the Successor States

The West has always had difficulty understanding the Soviet Union. For decades, analyses of America's Cold War foe were clouded by ideological passions and a shear dearth of information. Then came the... flood of dramatic revelations under glasnost, followed by the sudden, shocking collapse of the Communist empire. Today, with the stunning secrets of newly opened archives and the excitement of political revolution still fresh in our minds, and we can look back at this remarkable nation and see it whole, see Soviet history as a story with a beginning, a middle, and an end. In The Soviet Experiment, Ronald Grigor Suny does just that, in a landmark work that gives us the fullest account yet of the most remarkable story of our century. With a clear-eyed mastery of the historical issues and literature, Suny combines gripping detail with insightful analysis in a narrative that propels the reader from the last tsar of the Russian empire to the first president of the Russian republic. He focuses in particular on four revolutions, each identified with a single individual: the tumultuous year of 1917, when Vladimir Lenin led the Bolshevik takeover of the tsarist empire; the 1930s, when Joseph Stalin refashioned the economy, the society, and the state; Mikhail Gorbachev's ambitious, and catastrophic, attempt at sweeping reform and revitalization; and the breakup of the Soviet Union led by Boris Yeltsin. Never have we had a more complete, nuanced, and crystal-clear examination of the complex themes running through Soviet history. Suny confidently moves from party debates and personal rivalries, to centuries-old ethnic tensions, to vast economic and social developments. He unravels tangled issues with ease, explaining "deeply contradictory" policies toward the various Soviet nationalities; Moscow's ambivalence over its own New Economic Policy of the 1920s; and the attempts at reform that followed Stalin's death. Suny's treatment of the Soviet break-up warrants particular attention, as he details precisely how Gorbachev's program unleashed forces that had built up during the previous decades—particularly the nationalism that had been shaped, ironically, by the Soviet structure of ethnically defined republics. Along the way, he offers a fresh telling of familiar as well as little-known events—capturing, for example, the movement of the crowds on the streets of St. Petersburg in the February revolution; Stalin's collapse into a near-catatonic state after Hitler's much-predicted invasion; or Yeltsin's political maneuvering and public grandstanding as he pushed the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and then faced down his rivals. The Soviet Experiment provides a rich, multilayered, seamlessly woven account of one of the great forces of modern history. With dispassionate insight and human detail, Suny has constructed a masterful work.

Author:

Ronald Grigor Suny

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92507

The Fall Of Baghdad

No description available

Author:

Jon Lee Anderson

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55374

Down with Big Brother: The Fall of the Soviet Empire

"One of the great stories of our time . . . a wonderful anecdotal history of a great drama." —San Francisco Chronicle Book Review As Washington Post correspondent in Moscow, Warsaw, and Yugoslavia in ...the final decade of the Soviet empire, Michael Dobbs had a ringside seat to the extraordinary events that led to the unraveling of the Bolshevik Revolution.  From Tito's funeral to the birth of Solidarity in the Gda´nsk shipyard, from the tragedy of Tiananmen Square to Boris Yeltsin standing on a tank in the center of Moscow, Dobbs saw it all. The fall of communism was one of the great human dramas of our century, as great a drama as the original Bolshevik revolution. Dobbs met almost all of the principal actors, including Mikhail Gorbachev, Lech Walesa, Václav Havel, and Andrei Sakharov. With a sweeping command of the subject and the passion and verve of an eyewitness, he paints an unforgettable portrait of the decade in which the familiar and seemingly petrified Cold War world—the world of Checkpoint Charlie and Dr. Strangelove—vanished forever. "Down with Big Brother ranks very high among the plethora of books about the fall of the Soviet Union and the death throes of Communism. It is possibly the most vividly written of the lot." — Adam B. Ulam, Washington Post Book World

Author:

Michael Dobbs

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