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174770

The Rise of Superman: Decoding the Science of Ultimate Human Performance

An Exploration Of How Extreme Athletes Are Able To Break The Limits Of Ultimate Human Performance And What We Can Learn From Their Mastery Of The State Of Consciousness Known As Flow. -- Part One: He ...Is The Frenzy. The Way Of Flow ; The Wave Of Flow ; The Where Of Flow ; The What Of Flow ; The Flow Shortcut -- Part Two: Flow Hacker Nation. Outer Flow ; Inner Flow ; The We Of Flow ; The Flow Of Imagination -- Part Three: Time To Rise. The Dark Side Of Flow ; The Flow Of Next ; Flow To Abundance. Steven Kotler. Includes Bibliographical References And Index.

Author:

Steven Kotler

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121827

Super Human (The New Heroes/Quantum Prophecy, #4)

No description available

Author:

Michael Carroll

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46671

The Physics of Superheroes

What did the Flash know about the Special Theory of Relativity that you do not? Why did Ant-Man have so much difficulty with a half- filled bathtub? Kakalios (physics and astronomy, U. of Minnesota) c...ombines his love for comic books and the startling accurate ways they present physics with his love of explaining physics to undergraduates and those of us destined to never get beyond the comic book stage. While filling us in on why spending your allowance on x- ray glasses is a poor investment, Kakalios covers mechanics (including Newton's Law of Gravity, the properties of matter and the cube-square law) energy (including conservation and Ampere's Law), and modern physics (including quantum mechanics, solid-state physics and tunneling phenomena). In a final section, Kakalios also contemplates a series of superhero bloopers, proving that sometimes having mutant powers and three bucks is only good for a small cappuccino. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR Publishers Weekly This terrific book demonstrates a number of important points. First, a subject that everyone "knows" is difficult and boring can, in the hands of a master teacher, be both exciting and fun. Second, it's a myth that only people particularly adept at mathematics can understand and enjoy physics. Third, superhero comic books have socially redeeming qualities. By combining his love for physics with his love of comic books, University of Minnesota physicist Kakalios has written a book for the general reader covering all of the basic points in a first-level college physics course and is difficult to put down. Among many other things, Kakalios uses the basic laws of physics to "prove" that gravity must have been 15 times greater on Krypton than on Earth; that Spiderman's girlfriend, Gwen Stacy, died because his webbing stopped her too abruptly after she plunged from the George Washington Bridge; and that when the Flash runs, he's surrounded by a pocket of air that enables him to breathe. Kakalios draws on the Atom, Iron Man, X-Men, the Ant-Man and the Hulk, among many others, to cover topics as diverse as electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, string theory and thermodynamics. That all of this is accomplished with enough humor to make you laugh aloud is an added bonus. B&w illus. Agent, Jay Mandel. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Author:

James Kakalios

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156498

The Ability (The Ability, #1)

Delve into the extraordinary abilities of the twelve-year-old mind in this “fast-paced, superhero-tinged spy novel” (Publishers Weekly), the thrilling start to a middle grade series that expands the p...ossibilities of power. No one has any confidence in twelve-year-old Christopher Lane. His teachers discount him as a liar and a thief, and his mom doesn’t have the energy to deal with him. But a mysterious visit from the Ministry of Education indicates that Chris might have some potential after all: He is invited to attend the prestigious Myers Holt Academy. When Christopher begins at his new school, he is astounded at what he can do. It seems that age twelve is a special time for the human brain, which is capable of remarkable feats—as also evidenced by Chris’s peers Ernest and Mortimer Genver, who, at the direction of their vengeful and manipulative mother, are testing the boundaries of the human mind. But all this experimentation has consequences, and Chris soon finds himself forced to face them—or his new life will be over before it can begin.

Author:

M.M. Vaughan

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134561

The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man

Awesome Man can shoot positronic rays out of his eyeballs, fly as straight asan arrow, and hug mutant Jell-O! Even villains like Professor Von Evil and the Flaming Eyeball are no match for this caped ...crusader. But Awesome Man also has a secret. . . . Can you guess what it is? The first picture book from Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Michael Chabon perfectly captures the fantasy life of young superhero fans.

Author:

Michael Chabon

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95267

Superpowers

David J. Schwartz.

Author:

David J. Schwartz

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64460

Supernature

No description available

Author:

Lyall Watson

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218860

Superhuman Social Skills: A Guide to Being Likeable, Winning Friends, and Building Your Social Circle

No description available

Author:

Tynan

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103129

Heroes: Volume Two

The Emmy Award-nominated NBC TV series HEROES comes to comics in this spectacular hardcover graphic novel! With art by some of comics' tops illustrators and stories by the writers of the HEROES TV ser...ies, this volume features comics chapters previously seen online at NBC.com, This volume features artwork by Tim Sale that first appeared in the TV episodes.School Library JournalGr 6 Up–The collection of chapters 35-80 of the online graphic novel is a companion to NBC’s television series. It offers glimpses into the lives of Ando, Adam Monroe, and the Haitian, as well as other characters. Familiarity with the characters and plotlines is essential as the chapters jump from one story to another with no introduction. Several authors and illustrators contributed the quick-paced storytelling and full-color artwork, producing a few jarring transitions. Most of the stories are illustrated in the familiar American superhero comic style; a chapter on legendary figure Takezo Kensei is appropriately–and amusingly–presented as manga. Fans of the show will enjoy this gap-filler between seasons, but newcomers will definitely want to check out the previous graphic-novel compilation and perhaps some DVDs.–Beth Gallego, Los Angeles Public Library

Author:

Joe Kelly

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77425

The Science of Superheroes

If the planet Krypton had a gravitational field strong enough to account for Superman’s amazing strength, would it be possible to launch a rocket ship from the planet’s surface? Assuming tha...t the Flash could actually travel at the speed of light, would any villain ever stand a chance against him? Could evolution actually produce X-Men?The Science of Superheroes takes a light-hearted but clear-headed look at the real science that underlies some of the greatest superhero comic books of all time, including Spider-Man, Batman, the Fantastic Four, and many more. Each chapter presents the story of the origin of one or more superheroes and asks intriguing questions that lead to fascinating discussions about the limits of science, the laws of nature, and the future of technology.If gamma rays can’t turn a 128-pound weakling into the Incredible Hulk, what could? Are Spider-Man’s powers really those of a spider? Could a person ever breathe water like a fish? From telepathy to teleportation, from cloning to cosmic rays, this vastly entertaining romp through the nexus of science and fantasy separates the possible from the plausible and the barely plausible from the utterly ridiculous.You’ll discover the connection between black holes and green lanterns; what Galileo could have told Professor Pym about the stresses caused by shrinking and growing; and how many of Batman’s "inventions" anticipated actual technological developments such as the jet pack, unmanned aerial surveillance, and the optical laser. You’ll even learn how comic book writers use "technobabble" to create seemingly credible explanations of improbable superpowers and bizarre events.Packed with fascinating accounts of how these characters were developed, The Science of Superheroes celebrates the ingenuity and imagination of the writers and artists who created them and offers helpful suggestions on how the origin stories of certain characters could be made more believable. It offers immensely enjoyable and informative reading for anyone who loves science, superheroes, or both.

Author:

Lois H. Gresh

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